CHANGE LAWS

OUR CURRENT CAMPAIGNS

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Assembly Bill 256 was introduced by Asm. Ash Kalra. This bill builds upon the Racial Justice Act, passed in 2020 (AB 2542 – Kalra), that prohibits the state from seeking or obtaining a criminal conviction, or from imposing a sentence, based upon race, ethnicity or national origin. This bill extends these protections to those who have already been impacted by unfair convictions and sentences. Providing for retroactivity will give these individuals an equal opportunity to pursue justice.

Assembly Bill 292 was introduced by Asm. Mark Stone. This bill is a re-do of AB 3160 that was dropped in 2020 due to the pandemic. This bill seeks to eliminate common barriers to programming such as; long waitlists, frequent transfers, and inflexible work schedules that conflict with program availability, while also ensuring that programming continues during lockdowns. This bill also seeks to offer more Good Conduct credits to incarcerated folks.

AB 965 allows people to earn credits from their Youth Offender Parole Date, if that date is sooner than their original parole eligibility date. Under Proposition 57, credit-earning opportunities were created for people positively participating in educational and vocational programs, participating in leisure time activity groups, and for Good Time. These credit earning opportunities have allowed many people the opportunity to advance their release date, but these credits were not applied to the earliest possible parole hearing dates for people eligible for Youth Offender Parole. Now these people have the opportunity to move their parole dates forward based on participation in programming and achievements made inside.

Assembly Bill 1509 was introduced by Asm. Alex Lee. This bill seeks to eliminate most gun enhancements and significantly reduce all other gun enhancements to 1/2/3 years and provide a pathway for immediate re-sentencing for those currently incarcerated with gun enhancements. Sentence enhancements are costly, ineffective, and are a legacy of the failed tough on crime era. Approximately ~40,000 currently incarcerated folks are serving time for a gun enhancement, of which 89% are people of color.

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