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AB 3160 (Stone), or “the Evidence-Based Rehabilitation Act”, would allow more people to participate in positive credit-earning programming.Programming creates a safer corrections environment, inspiring hope among people inside, and allowing them to acquire skills that will help them to succeed post-incarceration. It will minimize disruptions in programming and credit-earning through common-sense measures, such as continuation of credits when a person is transferred or when the facility is on lockdown. AB 3160 will also address unequal access to the higher credit-earning rate associated with Fire Camp, by requiring the CDCR to offer the same increased credit-earning potential for in-prison programming to people who are eligible, but are unable to go to Fire Camp. This ensures that people who are older, disabled, or otherwise ineligible for Fire Camp have equal protection, justice, and opportunity to benefit from programming.

Co-Sponsors for this bill are: Initiate Justice, The Ella Baker Center, and Re:Store Justice.

 

ACA 6 and AB 646, the “Free the Vote Act,” would restore voting rights to every person on parole in California. This will require passing an Assembly Constitutional Amendment (ACA 6) and an Assembly Bill (AB 646) to put voting rights on the 2020 ballot. Nearly 50,000 people on parole in California are working, paying taxes, and positively contributing to their communities, yet they are unable to vote at any level of government. This system operates as “taxation without representation,” which is antithetical to the founding of this country.

AB 965 allows people to earn credits from their Youth Offender Parole Date, if that date is sooner than their original parole eligibility date. Under Proposition 57, credit-earning opportunities were created for people positively participating in educational and vocational programs, participating in leisure time activity groups, and for Good Time. These credit earning opportunities have allowed many people the opportunity to advance their release date, but these credits were not applied to the earliest possible parole hearing dates for people eligible for Youth Offender Parole. Now these people have the opportunity to move their parole dates forward based on participation in programming and achievements made inside.

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